CIC® in the Spotlight

Why did you choose a career in infection prevention and control? What does being a CIC® mean to you? What advice would you give to others pursuing certification? We want to put the Spotlight on you!

If you'd like to participate and be our next CIC® in the Spotlight, fill out the Questions and Release forms, and email them as attachments to info@cbic.org with the subject line "CIC in the Spotlight." Please also attach a headshot in the email so that we can include it in the Spotlight.

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Amy Rundle, RN, BScN, CIC

Being a CIC means so much to me – I am so proud of my accomplishment in attaining this certification. It gives me more confidence in decision making and being a part of our IPAC team.

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Andrea Harper, MS, MLS, CIC, CPPS, CPHQ

I became CIC certified for a few reasons. To identify any knowledge gaps while I was learning to be an IP, validate my self-training, in other words to prove to myself and others that “I knew what I knew”.

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Aneeta Paul, BSc, RN, CIC

The first and foremost learning is the experience itself during the initial stages of working as an infection control professional. Later, APIC guides & CDC bulletins play a key role in polishing the knowledge with updated guidelines.

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April Dagandan, BSN, RN, MN, CIC

My advice to someone who is interested to the infection prevention and control career is that, being an ICN can create wonders it will teach us meaningful lessons that we can share to the people around us.

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Benjamin Galvan, MLS(ASCP), CIC

Taking on the role of infection preventionist has given me the opportunity to challenge myself, get out of my comfort zone, and truly engage with my coworkers and colleagues throughout the hospital.

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Brandi Ford, CIC

I have only held my CIC certificate for a short while, but just in merely studying for the exam, I learned so much about my day-to-day work in my current position! I now have more confidence in providing and submitting information to Physicians and to Administrative levels.

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Elsy Mady, CIC

An Infection Control career is a place where you can make a real change in patient’s life not only in the hospital but in the community as well, you can learn everyday something new. So to be in this career my advice is to always be ready to learn, to know how to adapt what you have learned to your field of practice, to pursue certification in the domain.

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Emam Sha Badusha, BSN-RN, CIC

It was a dream come true! After continuous hard work and dedication for months, I cleared my CIC exam in the first attempt. Thanks to APIC text, managers and colleagues for sharing the valuable knowledge.

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Emily Timkang Quijano, RN, MSN, CIC

CIC had helped me a lot to grow professionally by having that confidence through successfully passing the exam and experience needed to be an IPC professional. I was able to know new knowledge and innovations through CBIC.

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Gerlyn Jalea, CIC

Be focused on your goal to pass. Have a dedicated time everyday for reading reference books and review materials. Peer review is also helpful.

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Harold Cabanalan, BSN, RN, MAN, CIC

My CIC roadmap started with the basics, and gradually headed to advance. Being surrounded by infection prevention and control experts, gives me a lot motivation to improve.

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Heba Zamel, CIC

I am a person who searches for excellence in my work. I love to help others in solving problems. I like to prevent harm to others, such as patients and workers. I find pleasure in finding solutions when a specific problem occurs. I look for excellence in the scientific field.

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Ihab Abd-Allah, MSc, CIC

The journey to be certified was a little longer for me but I was persistent to pass the exam, not only to be certified but also to keep in touch with the up-to-date of the knowledge in infection control practice.

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Jessica Tarabay, CIC

The opportunities of infection prevention and control are endless and with healthcare continuing to evolve, infection prevention and control will be essential across the healthcare continuum. Choose the setting that speaks most to you and get certified.

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Jithin Raj Rajendran Pillai, RN, CIC

An IP, who pass CIC certification, demonstrates his/her dedication to mastery in the Infection Prevention and Control practice. A balanced study schedule for preparation of CIC exam is the best approach. Make sure you have enough space to refer any of the primary reference materials specified by CBIC.

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Kerry Gerding, MSN-IPC, RN, CIC

Having a CIC credential is definitely a bonus when looking for a job.  It is also a bonus on your resume, and a status symbol, so to speak, giving you a boost up in credibility when needed at your facility.  It is evidence that you understand infection control fundamentals.

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Kirsten McNurlin, RN, BSN, CIC

As a new IP, I thrive on the interactions and discussions with my colleagues and other Infection Preventionists through my local APIC Chapter. I served as the President of APIC MT in 2019 and that has been a wonderful growth opportunity for me.

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Kristecia Estem, MPH, CIC

For those interested in the field of infection prevention and control, I would recommend contacting an infection preventionist or epidemiologist in an acute care institution or local department of health. These professionals will be able to share their experiences and provide more information regarding the different career pathways.

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Lee PeiXing Regina Himeko, BSN, MSc, CIC

Consistently reading up on articles available in APIC website, Infection Preventionist magazine, staying up to date with the country’s regulation and recommended practices in Infection Control, attending available online webinars and courses relating to Infection Prevention and Control.

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Marian Kabatoff, RN, BSN, MSc, CIC

Have a copy of the CIC study guide, the APIC manual and ICPs that can help you navigate some of the questions. CIC is worth it if you are pursuing jobs-most jobs require it so it is beneficial to have it.

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Maripete Generales Calpa, RN, CIC

If you are fascinated in an infection prevention and control career then follow your heart’s desire; yes, it is a one of a lifetime profession I can say but you need to make a pledge to yourself that you will do it responsibly with a sense of accountability because the safety and health quality of the whole population of your facility is in your hands.

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Meghan Engbretson, CIC

From a young age I had a keen interest in all things biology, specifically communicable and tropical diseases. The variety of the day-to-day work is what keeps me interested and motivated, in addition to having a direct effect on patient safety.

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Murtuza Diwan, BSc, MSc, CIC

There are no rules in Infection Prevention and Control. You go on a case by case basis using the best practices as applicable. Sometimes, it can be overwhelming, as infection prevention and control has it hands in pretty much everything

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Mustafeed Uddin Mohammed, MD, CIC

CIC was always a dream for me to become an internationally certified Infection Preventionist right from my pg days since there was no well-defined and structured training in developing countries like India.

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Nathalye Mendez, MSN, RN, CIC

I feel confident and reassured that I have the knowledge and mastery to continue my IC duties. By having the certification, practitioners and colleagues take me more serious. It also gives me a sense of pride and at the same time, I am aware of the increased responsibility to continue to grow in my profession.

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Saad Khan, CIC

Back in 2014, when I joined I realized the need for someone to take the responsibility to change the culture and promote patient safety. And I took charge, and ever since then, we could bring positive change in all aspects of patient care and infection prevention & control.

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Shaheena Surani, CIC

CIC credential is a symbol of competency and expertise in the field of infection prevention and control. It’s the commitment towards patient safety by instituting the best practices in clinical care.

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Shaimaa Abdelhaseb, MD, PDIC, EBIC, CIC

Practicing what is written in the guidelines is the best way to study IPC, as it put you in the real life inside the hospital & provide you with the whole real hidden challenges.

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Sheena Kabeer, RN, CIC

I am more knowledgeable and competent in each area of infection prevention and control after certification.

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Shirley Shores, CIC

I started my career in 1978 as the first IP in a community hospital. It sounded interesting-I had just completed a master's in microbiology and felt this was a good way to use what I had learned. I am retiring soon after 42 years in the field. It is ever-changing, never boring, and always something new to learn. And I feel we make a real difference in the lives of patients and employees.

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Souranshu Chatterjee, MBBS, MD, CPIC, CIC

My advice will be to be consistent in the efforts not only in studies but also in implementing the infection control standards as the exam evaluates the capability to face and trouble-shoot in various real-life scenarios which one may face.

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Steven Roncaioli, MPH, CIC

Do not rush the process. The most valuable part of your certification is the knowledge learned while preparing, not the 3 letters after your name.

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Yomna Setate, CIC

My advice to anyone interested in IC career is to go on; it is very important and challenging career.

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